Billie Holiday Eac

Billie Holiday - The Complete Commodore Recordings, 1939-1944 (1997) {2CD Set GRP Records CMD 24012}

Billie Holiday - The Complete Commodore Recordings, 1939-1944 (1997) {2CD Set GRP Records CMD 24012}
EAC rip (secure mode) | FLAC (tracks)+CUE+LOG -> 353 Mb | MP3 @320 -> 290 Mb
Full Artwork @ 300 dpi (jpg) -> 86 Mb | 5% repair rar
© 1939-44, 1997 Commodore / GRP Records | CMD 24012
Jazz / Vocal Jazz / Swing / Classic Female Blues / Traditional Pop

Throughout these sessions, a window into Billie Holiday's creative process is provided by the inclusion of alternate takes. Many of them are rare, although all have previously been issued on one or another of the labels that have interacted with Commodore over the years. As alternates for records on other labels also reveal, once Billie conceptualized her approach to a song, she seldom varied the basic template. She seemed to decide the best way to organize the expressive gifts at her disposal and "photograph" in her mind a musical image of how she would do the number. Once that image was in place, subsequent versions for the most part differed only in matters of nuance or animation.

Billie Holiday - You Go To My Head [Recorded 1938-1949] (2002)  Music

Posted by gribovar at June 10, 2018
Billie Holiday - You Go To My Head [Recorded 1938-1949] (2002)

Billie Holiday - You Go To My Head [Recorded 1938-1949] (2002)
EAC Rip | WavPack (image+.cue+log) - 314 MB | MP3 CBR 320 kbps (LAME 3.93) - 150 MB | Covers - 144 MB
Genre: Vocal Jazz | RAR 3% Rec. | Label: Dreyfus Jazz (FDM 36742-2)

Nowadays, the majority of those with two ears and a heart recognise her magnitude, whatever their usual musical preferences may be. This unanimity undoubtedly stems from the fact that Billie's voice reaches our greatest depths. Nobody has been troubled by her range, or by limited technical means the singer was offered, although she never needed anything other than her voice to shake the entire planet. Perhaps because Billie sang simply of love and love's desillusions, and the listeners are moved even without particularly grasping the textes. However, what we may hear is the result of a double paradow: vocal mastery, the placing of each syllabe, the perfect expression of each word confirms a tremendous virtuosity, the fruit of long experience; the emphasis put on the songs' lyrics, not often despairing all considered, come more from the despair of the interpreter than their actual contents…

Billie Holiday - Lady Sings The Blues (1956/2007)  Music

Posted by Domestos at June 6, 2018
Billie Holiday - Lady Sings The Blues (1956/2007)

Billie Holiday - Lady Sings The Blues (1956/2007)
EAC Rip | FLAC (tracks+.cue, log) ~ 127.84 Mb | 38:22 | Cover
Vocal Jazz | Country: USA | Label: Verve - B0009401-02

Taken from a pair of sessions taped during 1955-1956, Lady Sings the Blues finds Holiday in top form and backed by the sympathetic likes of tenor saxophonist Paul Quinichette, trumpeters Charlie Shavers and Harry Edison, pianist Wynton Kelly, and guitarists Kenny Burrell and Barney Kessel. And while these autumnal sides bear some of the frayed vocal moments often heard on Holiday's '50s Verve sides, the majority here still ranks with her best material. This is especially true of the cuts from the June 1956 date, which produced unparalleled versions of "No Good Man," "Some Other Spring," and "Lady Sings the Blues." See why many fans prefer the "worn out" Holiday heard here to the more chipper singer featured on those classic Columbia records from the '30s.

Billie Holiday - 1952 (2003)  Music

Posted by Domestos at May 27, 2018
Billie Holiday - 1952 (2003)

Billie Holiday - The Chronological Classics: 1952 (2003)
EAC Rip | FLAC (tracks+.cue, log) ~ 153.61 Mb | 67:51 | Covers
Vocal Jazz | Country: USA | Label: Classics - 1285

Billie Holiday's recording career can be viewed in three distinct phases. The singer's evolution begins with the Vocalion/OKeh/Columbia years, steadily maturing throughout the Commodore, Decca, and latter-day Columbia sessions, then ripening into music of incredible poignancy as she recorded almost exclusively with Norman Granz for his Clef and Verve labels during the 1950s.

Billie Holiday - 1945-1948 (1999)  Music

Posted by gribovar at April 30, 2018
Billie Holiday - 1945-1948 (1999)

Billie Holiday - 1945-1948 (1999)
EAC Rip | FLAC (tracks+.cue+log) - 179 MB | MP3 CBR 320 kbps (LAME 3.93) - 167 MB | Covers (7 MB) included
Genre: Vocal Jazz | RAR 3% Rec. | Label: Classics Records (CLASSICS1040)

Trading in the loose combo swing of her Columbia recordings for some sophisticated charts by Sy Oliver and Gordon Jenkins, Billie Holiday cut some of her best sides while at Decca during the latter half of the '40s. And even though Decca's own two-disc Complete Recordings set is highly recommended, this single volume still offers a fine overview for those not quite ready to fully commit. The absence of "God Bless the Child" notwithstanding, the mix covers most of Lady Day's Decca highlights, including "Deep Song," "Big Stuff," "Porgy," and her own "Don't Explain." There's also some quality duet work with Louis Armstrong and fine contributions from clarinetist Edmond Hall, trumpeter Billy Butterfield, and guitarist Mundell Lowe. A fine and generous sampling of Holiday at her peak.

Billie Holiday - 1944 (1995)  Music

Posted by gribovar at April 29, 2018
Billie Holiday - 1944 (1995)

Billie Holiday - 1944 (1995)
EAC Rip | FLAC (tracks+.cue+log) - 223 MB | MP3 CBR 320 kbps (LAME 3.93) - 169 MB | Covers (7 MB) included
Genre: Vocal Jazz | RAR 3% Rec. | Label: Classics Records (CLASSICS 806)

Recording Date: January 18, 1944 - November 8, 1944.
The first popular jazz singer to move audiences with the intense, personal feeling of classic blues, Billie Holiday changed the art of American pop vocals forever. More than a half-century after her death, it's difficult to believe that prior to her emergence, jazz and pop singers were tied to the Tin Pan Alley tradition and rarely personalized their songs; only blues singers like Bessie Smith and Ma Rainey actually gave the impression they had lived through what they were singing. Billie Holiday's highly stylized reading of this blues tradition revolutionized traditional pop, ripping the decades-long tradition of song plugging in two by refusing to compromise her artistry for either the song or the band…

Billie Holiday - 1940-1942 (1993)  Music

Posted by gribovar at April 28, 2018
Billie Holiday - 1940-1942 (1993)

Billie Holiday - 1940-1942 (1993)
EAC Rip | FLAC (tracks+.cue+log) - 296 MB | MP3 CBR 320 kbps (LAME 3.93) - 172 MB | Covers (7 MB) included
Genre: Vocal Jazz | RAR 3% Rec. | Label: Classics Records (CLASSICS 680)

Offering a viable alternative to Columbia's popular Quintessential series of Billie Holiday's 1933-1942 sides, Classics' multi-disc survey of the singer's early material features a handful of additional tracks per disc and oftentimes better sound. This is not to say the Columbia titles are to be overlooked, but if you come across one of these fine imports, don't hesitate in picking it up. This mix of Holiday's 1940-1942 material is especially recommended; the songs mark the end of her Columbia stay, showing the first signs of a voice mellowed and toughened by a life of nightlife dissipation. In addition to such classics as "God Bless the Child" and "Solitude," Holiday delivers often overlooked highlights like "Jim" and "I Cover the Waterfront"…

Billie Holiday And Her Orchestra - 1939-1940 (1991)  Music

Posted by gribovar at April 26, 2018
Billie Holiday And Her Orchestra - 1939-1940 (1991)

Billie Holiday And Her Orchestra - 1939-1940 (1991)
EAC Rip | FLAC (tracks+.cue+log) - 293 MB | MP3 CBR 320 kbps (LAME 3.93) - 163 MB | Covers (7 MB) included
Genre: Vocal Jazz | RAR 3% Rec. | Label: Classics Records (CLASSICS 601)

This volume of the Classics Chronological series places Billie Holiday's music in historical context to an unusual degree, as her recordings for the Columbia and Commodore labels have until now been reissued separately because of copyright and catalog ownership. The songs parceled together here were recorded at a crossroads in Holiday's career. The setting for the first - in what would constitute great changes in her life and music - was Barney Josephson's Café Society Downtown. Located at 2 Sheridan Square, this was Manhattan's first fully integrated nightclub. Its clientele included a number of politically progressive intellectuals and social activists…

Billie Holiday And Her Orchestra - 1937-1939 (1991)  Music

Posted by gribovar at April 24, 2018
Billie Holiday And Her Orchestra - 1937-1939 (1991)

Billie Holiday And Her Orchestra - 1937-1939 (1991)
EAC Rip | FLAC (tracks+.cue+log) - 214 MB | MP3 CBR 320 kbps (LAME 3.93) - 163 MB | Covers (7 MB) included
Genre: Vocal Jazz | RAR 3% Rec. | Label: Classics Records (CLASSICS 592)

While this Classics disc of Billie Holiday's 1937-1939 sides beats out Columbia's Quintessential titles for sound quality, it does pale a bit as far as top-notch material goes. That said, the 24 tracks here still boast fine performances, like "Trav'lin' All Alone," "You Go to My Head," and "I Can't Get Started." And the likes of Teddy Wilson, Lester Young, Buck Clayton, and Dicky Wells provide stellar backing. So, with the knowledge that this is part of a chronological run through Holiday's catalog - bad songs and all - one can still enjoy the disc with its more than merely adequate store of memorable cuts.

Billie Holiday - Ken Burns Jazz (2000)  Music

Posted by popsakov at Jan. 26, 2018
Billie Holiday - Ken Burns Jazz (2000)

Billie Holiday - Ken Burns Jazz (2000)
EAC Rip | WavPack (Img) + Cue + Log ~ 260 Mb | MP3 CBR320 ~ 160 Mb
Full Scans (PNG, 400 dpi) ~ 107 Mb | RAR 5% Recovery
Vocal Jazz, Standards | Verve Records #549 081-2

In conjunction with the release of Ken Burns' ten-part, 19-hour epic PBS documentary Jazz, Columbia issued 22 single-disc compilations devoted to jazz's most significant artists, as well as a five-disc historical summary. Since the individual compilations attempt to present balanced overviews of each artist's career, tracks from multiple labels have thankfully been licensed where appropriate. That's especially nice in the case of Billie Holiday, who recorded excellent and essential work for Columbia, Commodore, Decca, and Verve. Since her signature numbers were also spread out over those labels, and since Ken Burns Jazz includes pretty much all of her best-known songs, this makes an excellent introduction and an even better single-disc retrospective.