Bodies, Machines

Minds, Bodies, Machines, 1770-1930 (repost)  

Posted by interes at Nov. 26, 2014
Minds, Bodies, Machines, 1770-1930 (repost)

Minds, Bodies, Machines, 1770-1930 by Deirdre Coleman
English | ISBN: 0230284671 | PDF | 2011 | 248 pages | 4,4 Mb

Minds, Bodies, Machines, 1770-1930 (repost)  

Posted by interes at Oct. 6, 2013
Minds, Bodies, Machines, 1770-1930 (repost)

Deirdre Coleman, "Minds, Bodies, Machines, 1770-1930"
English | ISBN: 0230284671 | PDF | 2011 | 248 pages | 4.4 Mb

It is during the nineteenth century, the age of machinery, that we begin to witness a sustained exploration of the literal and discursive entanglements of minds, bodies, machines. This book opens with Ann Radcliffe's The Mysteries of Udolpho (1794) and ends in the trenches of the First World War.

Minds, Bodies, Machines, 1770-1930 [Repost]  

Posted by ChrisRedfield at July 28, 2013
Minds, Bodies, Machines, 1770-1930 [Repost]

Deirdre Coleman, Hilary Fraser - Minds, Bodies, Machines, 1770-1930
Published: 2011-06-07 | ISBN: 0230284671 | PDF | 248 pages | 4 MB
How We Became Posthuman: Virtual Bodies in Cybernetics, Literature, and Informatics (repost)

How We Became Posthuman: Virtual Bodies in Cybernetics, Literature, and Informatics by N. Katherine Hayles
English | 15 Feb. 1999 | ISBN: 0226321460 | 364 Pages | PDF | 8 MB

In this age of DNA computers and artificial intelligence, information is becoming disembodied even as the "bodies" that once carried it vanish into virtuality. While some marvel at these changes, envisioning consciousness downloaded into a computer or humans "beamed" Star Trek-style, others view them with horror, seeing monsters brooding in the machines. In How We Became Posthuman, N. Katherine Hayles separates hype from fact, investigating the fate of embodiment in an information age.
Medieval Identity Machines (Medieval Cultures) by Jeffrey J. Cohen

Medieval Identity Machines (Medieval Cultures) by Jeffrey J. Cohen
English | May 9, 2003 | ISBN: 0816640025, 0816640033 | 368 Pages | PDF | 2 MB

In Medieval Identity Machines, Jeffrey J. Cohen examines the messiness, permeability, and perversity of medieval bodies, arguing that human identity always exceeds the limits of the flesh.

Machines in Our Hearts by Kirk Jeffrey [Repost]  

Posted by tanas.olesya at June 26, 2015
Machines in Our Hearts by Kirk Jeffrey [Repost]

Machines in Our Hearts: The Cardiac Pacemaker, the Implantable Defibrillator, and American Health Care by Kirk Jeffrey
English | May 7, 2001 | ISBN: 0801865794 | 387 Pages | PDF | 1 MB

Today hundreds of thousands of Americans carry pacemakers and implantable cardioverter-defibrillators (ICDs) within their bodies. These battery-powered machines―small computers, in fact―deliver electricity to the heart to correct dangerous disorders of the heartbeat.
Networking: Communicating with Bodies and Machines in the Nineteenth Century (repost)

Networking: Communicating with Bodies and Machines in the Nineteenth Century By Laura Christine Otis
Publisher: Uni.ver.sity of Mi.ch.igan Pre.ss 2001 | 280 Pages | ISBN: 0472112139 | PDF | 13 MB
How We Became Posthuman: Virtual Bodies in Cybernetics, Literature, and Informatic

How We Became Posthuman: Virtual Bodies in Cybernetics, Literature, and Informatic
Language: English | EPUB / MOBI | ISBN-10: 0226321460 | 1999 | 364 pages | 0.8 MB / 0.6 MB

In this age of DNA computers and artificial intelligence, information is becoming disembodied even as the "bodies" that once carried it vanish into virtuality. While some marvel at these changes, envisioning consciousness downloaded into a computer or humans "beamed" Star Trek-style, others view them with horror, seeing monsters brooding in the machines. In How We Became Posthuman, N. Katherine Hayles separates hype from fact, investigating the fate of embodiment in an information age.
Machines in Our Hearts: The Cardiac Pacemaker, the Implantable Defibrillator, and American Health Care

Machines in Our Hearts: The Cardiac Pacemaker, the Implantable Defibrillator, and American Health Care
The Johns Hopkins University Press; 1 edition | May 7, 2001 | ISBN-10: 0801865794 | 384 pages | PDF | 1.05 Mb

Today hundreds of thousands of Americans carry pacemakers and implantable cardioverter-defibrillators (ICDs) within their bodies. These battery-powered machines—small computers, in fact—deliver electricity to the heart to correct dangerous disorders of the heartbeat.

How We Became Posthuman: Virtual Bodies in Cybernetics, Literature, and Informatics  eBooks & eLearning

Posted by Stalker1984 at Oct. 21, 2011
How We Became Posthuman: Virtual Bodies in Cybernetics, Literature, and Informatics

N. Katherine Hayles, "How We Became Posthuman"
U–-ty Of C,..go P.ress | ISBN: 0226321460 | 1999 | PDF | 366 pages | 7,82 mb

In this age of DNA computers and artificial intelligence, information is becoming disembodied even as the "bodies" that once carried it vanish into virtuality. While some marvel at these changes, envisioning consciousness downloaded into a computer or humans "beamed" Star Trek-style, others view them with horror, seeing monsters brooding in the machines. In How We Became Posthuman, N. Katherine Hayles separates hype from fact, investigating the fate of embodiment in an information age.