Beethoven Violin Spring

Anne-Sophie Mutter - Beethoven: Violin Sonatas 5, 9 (2002) [SACD ISO+HiRes FLAC]

Anne-Sophie Mutter - Beethoven: Violin Sonatas 5, 9 (2002)
PS3 Rip | SACD ISO | DST64 2.0 & DST64 6.0 >1-bit/2.8224 MHz | Covers | 3.92GB + 5% Recovery
FLAC tracks 2.0 24bit/88.2 kHz | Covers | 1.26MB + 5% Recovery

This SACD transfer of Anne-Sophie Mutter’s Beethoven violin sonatas, taken from a series of live recordings from 1998, does not transcend the questionable interpretations. In each of these famous sonatas, Mutter takes excessive liberties with respect to dynamics and phrasing, and while some listeners may appreciate the thought and care she puts into these readings, it sounds as if she is trying a bit too hard to be “musical”. For example, just before the exposition repeat of the “Spring” sonata, several instances of disproportionate agogic pauses, inconsistent use of vibrato, random adherences to sforzando markings, and a sporadic disregard for (or recasting of) dynamics combine to produce an overly fussy performance that lacks momentum and a sense of direction.
James Ehnes & Andrew Armstrong - Beethoven: Violin Sonatas Nos. 6 & 9 "Kreutzer" (2017)

James Ehnes & Andrew Armstrong - Beethoven: Violin Sonatas Nos. 6 & 9 "Kreutzer"
Classical | MP3 CBR 320 kbps | 61:52 min | 142 MB
Label: Onyx Classics | Tracks: 06 | Rls.date: 2017

The duo of old friends James Ehnes and Andrew Armstrong has established itself as one of the most exciting of our times. Their albums of violin sonatas by Franck & Strauss, and Debussy, Elgar & Respighi have been praised by critics worldwide. For this new album they turn to Beethoven and two A major sonatas with very different moods. The 9th, ‘Kreutzer’ sonata, is a huge work, heroic and turbulent in character – a kind of concerto for violin and piano.
Wolfgang Schneiderhan, Eugen Jochum - Beethoven: Violin Concerto; Mozart: Violin Concerto No.5 (1995)

Wolfgang Schneiderhan, Eugen Jochum - Beethoven: Violin Concerto; Mozart: Violin Concerto No.5 (1995)
EAC | FLAC (log,tracks+cue) -> 393 Mb (5% Rec.) | Scans included
Classical | Label: Deutsche Grammophon, #:447 403-2 | 1995 | 01:14:36

On this reissue we are also offered a characteristically classical performance of Mozart's A major Violin Concerto, in which the soloist directs the orchestral accompaniment. Schneiderhan launches into the first movement with great vitality and then sets the emotional world of the Adagio in an aura of calm tranquillity that makes the joyful contrasts of the finale, with its extrovert bravura, the more telling. The late-I 960s recording is fuller and rather more cleanly focused in the orchestra and the solo violin is vividly real, again with an admirable balance. But it is for the Beethoven Concerto that this record is indispensable and every collector who cares about this masterpiece should consider finding a place for Schneiderhan's interpretation in their personal CD library. –Gramophone [9/1995]

Anne-Sophie Mutter - Beethoven: Violin Concerto, Romances (2003) [SACD-R][OF]  Vinyl & HR

Posted by Discograf_man at Jan. 8, 2017
Anne-Sophie Mutter - Beethoven: Violin Concerto, Romances (2003) [SACD-R][OF]

Anne-Sophie Mutter - Beethoven: Violin Concerto, Romances (2003) [SACD-R][OF]
Classical | SACD ISO: DST 2.0, 5.0 > 1-bit/2.8224 MHz | Artwork | 4.19 GB + 5% Recovery
Label: Deutsche Grammophon | Release Year: 2003

Mutter's Beethoven Concerto was recorded live at the final subscription concerts of Karl Masur's long tenure as the New York Philharmonic's music director, and the beautifully played orchestral part is a tribute to his leadership. Mutter plays with a silken tone and astonishing technical command of her instrument–absolute ease in the stratospheric tessitura of the solo part, and an amazing array of microdynamic adjustments that display the infinite variety of pianissimos at her command.
Anne-Sophie Mutter & Herbert von Karajan - Beethoven: Violin Concerto (1980/2015)

Anne-Sophie Mutter & Herbert von Karajan - Beethoven: Violin Concerto
Classical | FLAC (tracks) 24-bit/96 kHz | 48:23 min | 879 MB | Digital booklet
Label: Deutsche Grammophon | Tracks: 03 | Rls.date: 1980/2015

A legend in his lifetime for his interpretations of Beethoven, Herbert von Karajan recorded a large swathe of the composer's oeuvre. Here, Karajan conducts the Berlin Philharmonic Orchestra, with violin soloist Anne-Sophie Mutter.
Shlomo Mintz, Giuseppe Sinopoli - Beethoven: Violin Concerto, Romances (1988)

Shlomo Mintz, Giuseppe Sinopoli - Beethoven: Violin Concerto, Romances (1988)
EAC | FLAC (tracks+.cue, log) - 294 MB | MP3 (CBR 320 kbps) - 164 MB | Covers Included | 01:05:22
Genre: Classical | Label: Deutsche Grammophon | Catalog: 4230642

Judging simply by timings, Mintz and Sinopoli seem to have decided on a middle path in their approach to the first movement of this concerto: they take nearly a minute less over it than Mutter and Karajan (also on DG), about a minute and a half more than Perlman and Giulini on EMI. Using ears rather than a stopwatch, however, they seem to be giving by far the slowest performance of the movement that I have heard in years. It is a reading from which anything which might savour of soloistic display has been expunged, in which no note, even one of a flourish of semiquavers, is allowed to be 'merely' decorative. Mutter is fond of polishing every note like a jewel, too, but the very opening of the concerto in hers and Karajan's reading sounds positively sprightly set beside the newcomer. The moment Mutter enters the speed slackens markedly, but Karajan watchfully assures that the pulse returns with each tutti, and a sense of momentum is present throughout, even during the soloist's most wayward rhapsodizings.
David Oistrakh, Lev Oborin - Beethoven. Violin Sonatas 5 & 9 (1962) [Japan 2015] PS3 ISO + Hi-Res FLAC

David Oistrakh, Lev Oborin - Beethoven. Violin Sonatas 5 & 9 (1962) [Japan 2015]
PS3 Rip | SACD ISO | DSD64 2.0 > 1-bit/2.8224 MHz | 58:42 minutes | Scans NOT included | 1,66 GB
or FLAC(converted with foobar2000 to tracks) 24bit/88,2 kHz | Scans NOT included | 1022 MB

Beethoven: Violin Concerto (Cambridge Music Handbooks) by Robin Stowell  eBooks & eLearning

Posted by thingska at Feb. 10, 2015
Beethoven: Violin Concerto (Cambridge Music Handbooks) by Robin Stowell

Beethoven: Violin Concerto (Cambridge Music Handbooks) by Robin Stowell
English | Feb 13, 1998 | ISBN: 0521451590, 0521457750 | 140 Pages | PDF | 4,4 MB
Mozart, Beethoven: Violin Sonatas / Kagan, Richter (2001)

Mozart, Beethoven: Violin Sonatas / Kagan, Richter (2001)
APE+cue+log | 2 CD | 518.10 Mb | Total Time: 76:20 + 51:54 min
Genre: Classical, Guitar | Label: Emi Classics Double Fforte | Format: Orig. recording remastered Released | Catalog#: 74293 | July 3, 2001

The Oleg Kagan/Sviatoslav Richter all-Mozart recital, recorded live at Tours in July, 1974, came out on a 1991 EMI budget CD release, minus the G major sonata K. 379. EMI now releases the whole recital in a richer, more present remastering, coupled with the pair's live 1976 Munich Beethoven Op. 23 and "Spring" …

Beethoven · Violin Sonatas · Mutter · Orkis  Music

Posted by platico at Oct. 15, 2009
Beethoven ·  Violin Sonatas · Mutter · Orkis

Beethoven · Violin Sonatas · Anne-Sophie Mutter · Lambert Orkis
FLAC+CUE 1GB | EAC | Log | Scans | 1998



To celebrate their ten years of collaboration, Anne-Sophie Mutter and Lambert Orkis recorded all ten of Beethoven's sonatas for violin and piano. Unlike most other integral sets, these recordings were made during live performances. DG already had the incendiary interpretations of Gidon Kremer and Martha Argerich in its catalogue, but these new versions offer a completely different brand of volatility. The most striking example of Mutter and Orkis's radical approach can be heard in the famous "Kreutzer" Sonata, Op. 47. Violinist and pianist resort to any means possible – including exceptionally flexible tempos and an enormous palette of tone colors – in their quest to express the intensity of Beethoven's musical vision. Although the audiences are raptly silent, their presence clearly adds a palpable charge of electricity to these performances. The interpretive freedom of these performances may not appeal to all tastes, but those who value music-making as a re-creative art should find Mutter and Orkis's interpretations singularly satisfying. In any case, the daring duo defiantly counters some critics' complaints that today's performers lack personality. Andrew Farach-Colton